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Online individual counseling, family therapy and psychology courses


Take courses now that can apply toward a degree later

Explore online learning at an accredited university as a non-degree student and sharpen skills for your current job. Individual courses can apply toward a future degree or fulfill specific coursework requirements.

Apply up to three courses toward a Capella degree

Get a head start on a degree without making a commitment to a degree program now. At Capella, you can apply up to three courses to a degree program when you’re ready.

Build skills you can bring to your current role

Further develop your competencies and skills in the fields of professional counseling, family therapy or psychology and bring new understanding of human behavior to your everyday work.

Classes start October 10

At a glance

  • Online
  • 3 Courses max. transfer

Thinking about a psychology degree? See what Capella has to offer.

COUN5106 - Assessment, Tests, and Measures (4 quarter credits) Learners in this course examine the assessment process and how tests and measures are used in counseling. Learners also explore the evolution of assessment methods, testing strategies and interpretation and fundamental measurement constructs.

COUN5107 - Principles of Psychopathology and Diagnosis (4 quarter credits) Learners in this course examine psychopathology principles, professional literature and current issues associated with assessing mental disorders. Learners critically evaluate diagnostic models, methods and approaches used in diagnosing and treating individuals, couples and families. Learners also explore the current DSM classifications and diagnostic issues associated with multicultural populations.

COUN5108 - Foundations of Addiction and Addictive Behavior (4 quarter credits) This course provides learners with fundamental knowledge of addiction from its historical roots through contemporary issues. Learners examine theory and research that guides treatment for substance use disorders and related addictive behaviors, including the diagnosis and treatment of co-occurring mental health issues. In addition, learners review empirically supported interventions for individuals, families, groups and diverse populations, as well as emerging issues in the field based upon current research.

COUN5225 - Human Sexuality (4 quarter credits) Learners in this course study sexuality within the broad context of human experience. Learners examine a systemic psychosexual approach to development across the lifespan and evaluate the functionality of sexual behavior in individuals, couples and families. In addition, learners explore theory, assessment, treatments and interventions for various issues associated with sexuality, as well as sexuality-related concerns of diverse populations. Throughout the course, learners are challenged to expand personal awareness of limitations and biases that could impact the therapeutic relationship.

COUN5238 - Crisis Assessment and Intervention (4 quarter credits) This course presents crisis intervention and emergency management models and strategies used in the counseling field. Learners focus on developing the crisis intervention skills needed to provide counseling services in mental health settings in a timely, effective and ethical manner. Learners also explore other related topics, including working with situational crises, assessing suicide and other risks and supporting the implementation of emergency management plans.

COUN5239 - Theories of Psychotherapy (4 quarter credits) This course presents various theories of psychotherapy and their respective philosophical principles and assumptions. Learners evaluate the theoretical concepts and evidence-based practices of psychotherapy and examine appropriate application of theories and interventions to a diverse client population.

COUN5271 - Marriage and Family Systems (4 quarter credits) Learners in this course study families as systems from theoretical, clinical and research perspectives. The course emphasizes family development, transitions, assessment and intervention, including consideration for diversity and sociocultural factors. Learners also apply systems-oriented assessment models and strategies for initial interviews, hypothesis formulation and designing a strategy for intervention.

COUN5279 - Life Planning and Career Development (4 quarter credits) In this course, learners develop foundational knowledge and skills applicable to career counseling and development. Learners analyze theoretical models of career development as they relate to client interests, aptitudes, personalities, traits, values and work preferences. In addition, learners explore the ways in which social interests, family relationships, cultural facets and developmental factors and circumstances resulting from life transitions relate to career development across the lifespan. Learners also discuss legal and ethical issues associated with career counseling practice.

COUN5238 - Crisis Assessment and Intervention (4 quarter credits) This course presents crisis intervention and emergency management models and strategies used in the counseling field. Learners focus on developing the crisis intervention skills needed to provide counseling services in mental health settings in a timely, effective and ethical manner. Learners also explore other related topics, including working with situational crises, assessing suicide and other risks and supporting the implementation of emergency management plans.

COUN5336 - Counseling and Advocacy with Diverse Populations (4 quarter credits) This course introduces theory, research and models that inform ethical and culturally competent counseling, as well as social justice advocacy, in a variety of settings. Learners assess how biopsychosocial characteristics and concerns of diverse populations impact access to and utilization of community-based resources, optimal development across the lifespan and equity. Learners also present strategies to address the influence that their own heritage, attitudes, beliefs and acculturative experiences has on the counseling process. In addition, learners identify effective counseling and advocacy strategies with diverse individuals, couples, families and groups, and explore the role of the counselor and advocate in promoting social justice at multiple levels.

MFT5270 - Family Therapy Theory and Methods (4 quarter credits) This course is a comparative study of the prominent schools of thought within the field of marriage and family therapy. Learners demonstrate knowledge of the tenets, therapeutic strategies and techniques used within the field. Learners also evaluate therapy and counseling approaches to structural, strategic, transgenerational, behavioral, communication and analytical models in working with couples and families.

MFT5271 - Working with Families Across the Life Span (4 quarter credits) In this course, learners build an understanding of families as systems, in particular family development, transitions, assessment and intervention across the lifespan. Learners also integrate diversity and sociocultural factors in the application of systemic assessment and intervention strategies.

MFT5336 - Diversity and Social Justice in Systemic Family Therapy (4 quarter credits) This course introduces theory, research and models that inform ethical, culturally competent clinical work and social justice advocacy in a variety of settings. Learners use strategies to address the influence of heritage, attitudes, beliefs and acculturative experiences on the therapeutic process. In addition, learners gain knowledge of effective systemic therapy and advocacy strategies with diverse individuals, couples, families and groups and determine ways to advocate and promote social justice at multiple levels.

PSY7310 - Biological Basis of Behavior (5 quarter credits) This course is an introduction to physiological psychology and associated topics, including genetics, functional neuroanatomy and physiology. Learners develop and demonstrate an understanding of brain functioning; sensory systems; attention, memory, perception and language mechanisms; and the effects of neurotransmitters on human behavior. Learners also identify the relationship between brain functions and behavioral disorders and analyze current physiological psychology research, ethics and the implications of culture and diversity on field-related issues.

PSY7330 - Psychopharmacology (5 quarter credits) Learners in this course explore the behavioral and therapeutic effects of psychoactive drugs. Course topics include synaptic transmission, behavioral role of specific neuromodulatory systems, pharmacological treatment of mental and neurological disorders, addiction, the various side effects of psychoactive drugs and how these may interact with key characteristics such as age or general health. Drug effects on learning, creativity, memory, sleep, perception and sexual functioning receive special attention. Learners also examine the efficacy of treating patients with a combination of psychotherapy and psychotropic medications for a number of diagnosed mental disorders including depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, obsessive compulsive behavior, schizophrenia and childhood disorders.

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